The Call for Proposals will close at  midnight Friday, April 19. 

Please read the information below about general guidelines, types of presentations, conference tracks, and review criteria for proposals. Then submit your proposal at the bottom of the page.

General Guidelines

Please note these two very important guidelines when creating and submitting your proposal:

  • Proposal abstracts are limited to 500 words in length, including any references.
  • In order to increase the number of people we can learn from at the conference, no person may be listed as a presenting author on more than two (2) proposals. If an individual is listed as a presenting author on more than two proposals, only the first two proposals submitted will be reviewed (i.e., additional proposals will be rejected without review.)

Types of Presentations

Proposals to present at OpenEd19 must be categorized as one of the following Types of presentation:

  • Lightning Talk (5 minutes) – this is a very short version of a traditional conference presentation
  • Poster / Demo Session (50 minutes) – presenters stand near posters that describe their work and answer attendee questions as attendees during the evening reception
  • Roundtable (25 minutes) – these intimate conversations include 8 – 10 people seated around a table
  • Traditional Presentation (25 minutes) – this is a traditional conference presentation
  • Panel Presentation (50 minutes) – up to three people make brief opening remarks and then answer audience questions, facilitated by a separate moderator

Conference Tracks

Proposals to present at the conference should directly address one of the following topics. If your presentation fits under multiple tracks, please select the track you believe best matches your proposal.

  • INTERSECTIONS: OER and Accessibility
  • INTERSECTIONS: OER and Assessment
  • INTERSECTIONS: OER and Learning Analytics
  • INTERSECTIONS: Synergies Between Open Education, Open Data, Open Access, and/or Open Source
  • MODELS: Models Supporting the Adoption, Use, or Sustaining of OER in Adult Basic Education
  • MODELS: Models Supporting the Adoption, Use, or Sustaining of OER in Developing Countries
  • MODELS: Models Supporting the Adoption, Use, or Sustaining of OER in Higher Education
  • MODELS: Models Supporting the Adoption, Use, or Sustaining of OER in Minority Serving Institutions
  • MODELS: Models Supporting the Adoption, Use, or Sustaining of OER in K-12 Education
  • OPEN: Critiques of OER and Open Education
  • OPEN: The Ethics of Open Education
  • OPEN: The Meaning of Open
  • OPEN: Open in the Disciplines
  • OPEN: What’s Next for OER, Open Pedagogy, and Open Education
  • RESEARCH: Research on the Impact of OER
  • RESEARCH: Research on the Impact of Open Pedagogy, Open Educational Practices, and OER-Enabled Pedagogy
  • ROLES: The Role of Administration in Advocating for, Supporting, or Sustaining OER Adoption and Use
  • ROLES: The Role of Faculty in Advocating for, Supporting, or Sustaining OER Adoption and Use
  • ROLES: The Role of Instructional Designers in Advocating for, Supporting, or Sustaining OER Adoption and Use
  • ROLES: The Role of Librarians in Advocating for, Supporting, or Sustaining OER Adoption and Use
  • ROLES: The Role of Students in Advocating for, Supporting, or Sustaining OER Adoption and Use
  • SOCIAL: Increasing Hope through Open Education
  • SOCIAL: Intersectionality and Open Pedagogy
  • SOCIAL: Open Education and Social Justice
  • SOCIAL: The Politics of Open Education
  • STRATEGIES: Collaborations in Support of Open Education
  • STRATEGIES: Open Pedagogy, Open Educational Practices, and OER-Enabled Pedagogy
  • STRATEGIES: Promoting and Evaluating Institutional and Governmental Open Policies
  • STRATEGIES: Tools and Technologies Supporting Open Education
  • SUSTAINABILITY: Business Models for Open Education
  • SUSTAINABILITY: The Economics of Open Education
  • UNANTICIPATED: Other Topics

Review Criteria

Proposal reviewers will use the following questions to guide their ratings of proposals. These questions were adapted from the OER18 Criteria for Review (CC BY).

1. Is it relevant to open education? Is it submitted under the appropriate track?

We adopt a broad interpretation of ‘education’ that includes formal and informal learning settings in schools, colleges, universities, the workplace, homes, and communities, and that occurs at any stage in learners’ lives, including continuing and adult education.

2. Does it make a contribution to the practice, scholarship, or research of open education?

Does the proposal include novel practices, techniques, findings, models, methodological approaches, or other information that will be beneficial to the field?

3. Is it clear and coherent?

Has the author clearly stated their purpose or objectives research questionIs the abstract well written, with reasonably correct grammar and punctuation?

4. Does it avoid being overly commercial?

Some proposals may have a strong focus on a specific product or service that is being promoted by a commercial company on its own or in partnership with an educational institution. Is the proposal sufficiently focused on the conference themes and useful for participants that it is more than a ‘sales pitch’?

5. What is your overall recommendation?

Definitely accept: I would argue strongly for accepting this proposal.
Probably accept: I would argue for accepting this proposal.
Borderline: I would neither argue for nor against accepting this proposal.
Probably reject: I would argue for rejecting this proposal.
Definitely reject: I would argue strongly for rejecting this proposal.